Tag Archives: Gadiel

SOS: Sounds on (the) Ship

By Rick Keil

The Secondary Maxes playing tunes on a crazy Friday evening of sampling.

The Secondary Maxes playing tunes on a crazy Friday evening of sampling.  From left; Anna, Emily, Bary, Rick, Osvaldo and Chloe.

The Nathaniel Palmer is a very loud ship.  Engines, generators, pumps, hydraulics, computers, etc; everything aboard ship seems designed to make noise.  Apparently when the ship was built they saved money by eliminating things like mufflers or noise-dampening panels. Profit over comfort…  Anyway, I hear it is even louder when ice breaking, but we are in the more tropical latitudes so all we hear is the sound of the engines and not the sound of crunching ice.  Many of us have taken to covering our ears when moving about certain spaces on the ship, and there are at least four different brands of ear protection available.  Turns out that I favor ‘Skull Screws’.  They effectively tune out the ship and let my tinnitus be the only sound that annoys me.

Luckily, not all the sounds aboard ship are annoying.  Most of our lab spaces have small stereos set up, and Cal in particular can often be found cranking out some good loud tunes.  Conversations are welcome sounds; people sharing jokes, science or just the joys of being at sea.  This is a friendly bunch aboard ship, and it is nice to hear all the happy chatter.

Jaqui on guitar and vocals.

Jaqui on guitar and vocals.

The best sounds aboard ship are found late at night in the wet lab.  Every second or third day a rotating set of us have been assembling to pick up instruments and play songs.  We have created an informal band named The Secondary Maxes (so-called because we are searching for secondary nitrite and chlorophyll maximums).  Several people aboard ship are very adept at guitar, with special shout-outs to Ger, Osvaldo, Bary and Gadiel.  Each one specializes in some sort of amazing guitar sound, and each has an interesting history.  Ger can change chords like nobody’s business and he has an amazing ability to pick up tabs and play a song perfectly the first time.  One time, perhaps many years ago, he was a singer of children’s songs; our on Raffi right here aboard ship.  Osvaldo seems to have the entire repertoires of Jim Croce and Cat Stevens in his fingers.  This is quite fun for me, but none of the young kids (by definition: anyone under 40) know any of the songs!  Imagine that…  Somewhere the education system is failing us.  Gadiel is good at Spanish guitar and Bary can play lead on most songs from the 1960’s with an apparent specialization in the Ventures and other surfer music.

The band also has 3 ukuleles and a keyboard.  People have been switching between these smaller instruments but special awards out to Jaqui for her multitude of talents on keyboard and voice, Emily for her instinctively good chord changes, Erwin on maracas, Chloe for ukulele strumming, Nick for his keyboard wizardry and Anna for so quickly learning her first ukulele tune “Noodling in G with Turnarounds”.  After seeing so much talent aboard ship, I realized that my guitar and ukulele skills were of limited use, so I made a bass out of a broom handle and a 5 gallon bucket.  Thus, I am the unofficial band beat-keeper.

Me on guitar.

Me on guitar.

What song are we best at?  “The Cups Song” (You’re going to miss me when I go”).  Almost everyone in the band has learned to play the cup-clapping sequence; you should come aboard ship and see us play sometime!  Tickets are free.

El Nathaniel Palmer es un barco muy fuerte. Motores, generadores, bombas, sistemas hidráulicos, computadoras, etc, todo a bordo del barco parece diseñado para hacer ruido. Al parecer, cuando se construyó la nave se guardan dinero al eliminar cosas como silenciadores o paneles de amortiguación del ruido. Me han dicho que es aún más fuerte cuando se rompe el hielo, pero estamos en las latitudes más tropicales tan sólo se oye el sonido de los motores y no el sonido del crujir del hielo. Muchos de nosotros hemos tenido que cubre los oídos cuando se mueve sobre determinados espacios de la nave, y hay por lo menos cuatro marcas diferentes de protección auditiva disponible. Resulta que estoy a favor de “Los tornillos del cráneo. Se eliminan eficazmente el barco y dejar que mi tinnitus sea el único sonido que me molesta.

 

Bary and I laying down some surfer music.

Bary and I laying down some surfer music.

Por suerte, no todos los sonidos a bordo del barco son molestos. La mayoría de nuestros espacios de laboratorio han establecido pequeños equipos de música, y Cal, en particular, a menudo se puede encontrar el arranque de algunas buenas melodías fuertes. Las conversaciones son sonidos de bienvenida, la gente compartiendo bromas, la ciencia o simplemente las alegrías de estar en el mar. Se trata de un grupo muy amigable a bordo del barco, y es agradable escuchar toda la charla feliz.
Los mejores sonidos a bordo del barco se encuentran a altas horas de la noche en el laboratorio húmedo. Cada dos o tres días una serie rotativa de nosotros hemos estado reuniendo para recoger los instrumentos y reproducir canciones. Hemos creado un grupo informal llamado Los Maxes secundarios (llamados así porque estamos en busca de nitrito de secundaria y máximos de clorofila). Varias personas a bordo del barco son muy expertos en la guitarra, con especial grito-outs a Ger, Osvaldo, Bary y Gadiel. Cada uno de ellos se especializa en algún tipo de sonido de guitarra increíble, y cada uno tiene una historia interesante. Ger puede cambiar los acordes como nadie y tiene una capacidad asombrosa para recoger las fichas y reproducir una canción perfectamente la primera vez. Una vez, tal vez hace muchos años, fue una cantante de canciones para niños, en nuestro Raffi aquí a bordo del barco. Osvaldo parece tener todo el repertorio de Jim Croce y Cat Stevens en sus dedos. Esto es muy divertido para mí, pero ninguno de los niños pequeños (por definición: cualquier persona menor de 40) conocía a ninguno de las canciones! Imagina que … En alguna parte del sistema de educación nos está fallando. Gadiel es bueno en la guitarra española y Bary puede jugar conducen en la mayoría de las canciones de la década de 1960 con una aparente especialización en las empresas y otras músicas surfista.
La banda también tiene 3 ukeleles y un teclado. La gente ha estado cambiando entre estos instrumentos más pequeños, pero los premios especiales a Jaqui por su multitud de talentos en el teclado y voz, Emily por sus instintivamente buenos cambios de acordes, Erwin en las maracas, Chloe para rasguear ukulele, Nick por su magia teclado y Anna durante tanto rápidamente aprenden su primera melodía ukelele “Noodling en G con Turnarounds”. Después de ver tanto talento a bordo del barco, me di cuenta de que mi guitarra y ukelele habilidades eran de uso limitado, así que hice un bajo de un palo de escoba y un balde de 5 galones. Por lo tanto, yo soy de la banda oficial beat-Keeper.
¿Qué canción estamos mejor? “La canción de Copas” (Usted me vas a extrañar cuando me vaya “). Casi todo el mundo en el que la banda ha aprendido a tocar la secuencia taza de las palmas, así que debería venir a bordo del barco y vernos tocar alguna vez! Las entradas son gratuitas.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Life Aboard Ship

by Peter Von Dassow

Life aboard presents some challenges to those of us that do not normally live at sea.  We are moving all the time, rocking and swaying with the swell.  Even in rough seas, the R/V Palmer is such a large and stable vessel that most of us are not seasick, but it takes getting used to. Little things stand out. For instance, we can’t use chairs with rollers, and every time I’m at a desk or a meeting table I push and expect to roll away to stand up, but the chair doesn’t move and I feel stuck.

Another challenge is the constant noise, with the ship’s engines, the sea, and all the different machines.

Both the crew and the scientists must work in shifts, and we the scientists many times have to work very long hours, going to bed at 5 or 6 in the morning and getting up only a few hours later if necessary. The ship’s external lights are on all night for the security of scientists and crew working outside: It is a city that never sleeps!

We get four meals a day in the galley or mess, which is the dining room of the ship.  Always the cook tries to provide a variety of things to offer, usually 3 choices of main course, including rich meaty dishes and vegetarian dishes.  Fresh vegetables and salads are offered, but of course the ship can’t buy new vegetables until it comes again to port, so the choice of fruits is limited and is expected to diminish throughout the cruise.  Outside of meal times, the galley is always open and there is always something available to eat, such as pears, oranges, yogurts, bread, cereals, and lots of cookies and ice cream.  Meal times are very strict, with breakfast from 7:30-8:30, lunch from 11:30-12:30m, dinner from 17:30-18:30, and “mid rats” (midnight rations, for those on the night shift) from 23:30-00:30. It’s difficult to keep slim on a ship!

Combining evacuation drill, science crew meeting, and liquid nitrogen ice cream preparation.

Combining evacuation drill, science crew meeting, and liquid nitrogen ice cream preparation.

Until next time!

La vida a bordo

La vida a bordo presenta ciertos desafíos para quienes normalmente no vivimos en el mar. Nos estamos moviendo constantemente, meciéndonos y balanceándonos al compás del movimiento del buque. Incluso con el mar picado, debido a lo grande y estable del Palmer, la mayoría de nosotros no nos mareamos, pero nos toma un tiempo acostumbrarnos. Pequeñas cosas resaltan. Por ejemplo, no se pueden usar sillas con ruedas, y cada vez que estoy en un escritorio o mesa de reuniones tiendo a echarme hacia atrás para levantarme esperando que la silla ruede y me siento  atrapado.

Otro desafío es el constante ruido, de los motores del barco, del mar, y de las distintas maquinarias.

Tanto la tripulación como los científicos debemos trabajar en turnos, y nosotros los científicos muchas veces trabajamos largas horas,  acostándonos a las 5 o 6 de la mañana para levantarnos unas horas más tarde si es necesario. Las luces externas del buque están siempre prendidas, para la seguridad de los científicos y la tripulación que trabaja en cubierta, ¡es una ciudad que no duerme!

Nuestras comidas son cuatro veces al día en el casino, que es el comedor del barco. El cocinero trata siempre de proveer  una variedad de cosas, usualmente tres elecciones de platos principales, incluyendo platos vegetarianos y en base a carnes. Vegetales frescos y ensaladas están disponibles, pero por supuesto el buque no puede comprar vegetales frescos hasta que llegue nuevamente a puerto. Fuera de los horarios de comida, el  casino está siempre abierto y con cosas disponibles para comer, como peras, yogurts, pan, cereales, helado y muchas galletas. Los horarios de las comidas eso si son estrictos, con el desayuno de 7:30 a 8:30, el almuerzo de 11:30 a 12:30, la cena de 17:30 a 18:30 y la “ración de medianoche” de 23:30 a 00:30. ¡Es difícil mantener la línea a bordo! [agregado por Osvaldo].

Peter von Dassow

9 July, 2013

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Saludos desde altamar

El lunes se cumplió una semana desde que zapamos desde Valparaíso a bordo del buque de investigación norteamericano Nathaniel B. Palmer, un rompehielos que normalmente trabaja en la Antártica. Para la mayoría de los científicos a bordo (incluyendo los dueños de casa), es la primera vez que estamos en este tipo de buques.

En estos momentos nos encontramos trabajando a la altura de Lima, más de trescientas millas mar afuera; lo haremos también al sur de Iquique en unas semanas más.  Somos veintiocho personas las que conformamos el grupo científico, mujeres y hombres de varias nacionalidades, repartidos en investigadores principales, estudiantes, postdoctorantes y técnicos. Poco a poco hemos ido conociendo a los miembros de los distintos grupos  de trabajo y al Capitán y su tripulación, que son como treinta.

En el grupo de Chile somos ahora cinco (ver Foto 1), pero intercambiaremos algunos investigadores en Iquique a mediados de julio.

 

De izquierda a derecha/From left to right: Gadiel Alarcón, Ger van den Engh, Osvaldo Ulloa, Montserrat Aldunate, Peter von Dassow.

De izquierda a derecha/From left to right: Gadiel Alarcón, Ger van den Engh, Osvaldo Ulloa, Montserrat Aldunate, Peter von Dassow.

¿Qué andamos investigando? De manera sintética, microorganismos que habitan  aguas con escasez de oxígeno y alto contenido de CO2, típicas del norte de Chile y el Perú. En la jerga científica estos ambientes son conocidos como “zonas de mínimo de oxígeno o en forma más coloquial como “zonas de la muerte”,  porque en ellas muchos de los peces y mariscos se asfixian. Sin embargo, en estos ambientes abunda una gran diversidad de microorganismos, de los cuales conocemos muy poco.  Estas zonas deficientes en oxígeno pueden ser importantes en la regulación de la productividad marina global y del clima, y son modelos naturales para predecir como funcionará el océano en el futuro.

Gracias a nuestros proyectos regulares FONDECYT y uno de colaboración CONICYT-USA tenemos la posibilidad de participar de esta fascinante expedición.

A través de este blog les iremos contando de nuestra peculiar vida a bordo y algunos detalles de la  investigación que estamos llevando a cabo.

Hasta la próxima.

Osvaldo Ulloa (Universidad de Concepción)
Peter von Dassow (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)
3 de julio, 2013

BB1_40x_007b-withscaleHello from the high seas!

On Monday passed the first week after we left Valparaíso on board the North American research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer, an ice breaker that normally works in Antarctica. For the majority of scientists on board (including the owners), this is the first time we are on this type of ship.

In this moment we find ourselves working at the latitude of Lima, more than 300 miles offshore, we will do this again in the south of Iquique in a few weeks more. Our scientific party includes 28 people, men and women of different nationalities, with principal investigators, students, postdocs, and technicians. Little by little we have gotten to know the members of the different working groups and the Captain and the crew of 30 sailors.

In the group from Chile we are now 5 (see Photo 1), but we will change a few investigators in Iquique in mid-July.

What are we investigating? In a synthetic manner, we study the microorganisms that live in waters where oxygen is scarce and the CO2 content is high, which are typical of the north of Chile and Peru.  In scientific parlor these environments are called “Oxygen Minimum Zones” but in colloquial terms they are called “dead zones”, because many fish and shellfish suffocate in them. Nevertheless, abundant and diverse microbes exist in these environments, of which little is known.  These oxygen-deficient zones could be important in global ocean productivity and climate regulation, and also represent natural laboratories for predicting how the ocean will function in the future.

Thanks to projects financed by the Chilean FONDECYT and a CONICYT grant for collaboration with the USA, we are able to participate in this fascinating expedition.

Through this blog we will tell you about our peculiar life aboard and in more details about the research we are conducting.

Until next time!

Osvaldo Ulloa (Universidad de Concepción)
Peter von Dassow (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)

July 3rd, 2013

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized